The Week Ahead

3-4 August

With the Sun in Leo (hot-dry) and the Moon in Aquarius (hot-wet), the energy of today and tomorrow is Choleric/Sanguine.

Humoural theory is based on the ancient and medieval physiology and medicine as expounded by Empedocles, Hippocrates, and Galen. It’s all to do with the four blocks or ‘roots’ of the material world (Fire, Earth, Water, and Air) that manifest in certain humours and their related temperaments. Humoural theory underpinned much of Early Modern drama, and was extensively used by well-known playwrights of the period like Shakespeare and Ben Jonson.

Previously, we have experienced Choleric/Sanguine as linked to enthusiastic pleasantries and colourful drama, now the same could get you into big trouble. To understand how it works, let’s take a closer look at Jonson’s 17th century satire, Volpone.

Unlike Shakespeare, whose characters either balance (self-cancel) each other as with Falstaff and Prince Hal in Henry IV or fail to find balance as did Hamlet, Jonson’s characters find balance through outside forces. Nonetheless, the lessons to be learned remain the same.

As a Choleric, Volpone (‘sly fox’) is quick witted and bold; he is also given to jesting, mocking, and lying. Along with his servant, Mosca, Volpone plots a clever hoax to dupe those aspiring to inherit his fortunes because he glories ‘more in the cunning purchase of my wealth’ than it its ‘possession’.

When the clever hoax fails, Volpone loses his wealth and is sent to prison. In true Sanguine fashion – indifferent to both vice and virtue and the results they may bring – in his final address, Volpone says that for him ‘no suffering is due’ if the audience praises him – ‘clap your hands’.

Some key words for this energy include:

  • Amoral
  • Playful
  • Proud
  • Brash
  • Clever

Advice: Keep your wits about you and beware of your wit.


5-6 August

With the Sun in Leo (hot-dry) and the Moon in Pisces (cold-wet), the energy of today and tomorrow is Choleric/Phlegmatic.

Humoural theory is based on the ancient and medieval physiology and medicine as expounded by Empedocles, Hippocrates, and Galen. It’s all to do with the four blocks or ‘roots’ of the material world (Fire, Earth, Water, and Air) that manifest in certain humours and their related temperaments. Often, we experience various combinations of the four humours resulting in mixed temperaments – the less balance between them – the worse as we will soon discover.

Previously, we have experienced Choleric/Phlegmatic as associated with a cold shower on unbridled passions, now those passions never even get off the ground. Whilst Choleric energy is characterised as fiery and proud, Phlegmatic energy (as expressed in Pisces) is noted by John Harington in his 17th century Poems on Temperament, as ‘so dead their spirits, so dull their senses are’.  

This makes perfect sense when we remember that Leo and Pisces form a confusing quincunx (150 degree) aspect to each other. In psychological astrology, the quincunx is linked to a crisis or dilemma that defies solution not the least because it revolves around what appears to be equally unsatisfactory alternatives. Moving forward is more than likely to require a sacrifice of some sort.

This is rather bad news to the unbridled passions of the Choleric. Equally, it is bad news for the slow-paced deliberations of the self-contented Phlegmatic. Neither stand much chance of getting their way.

Some key words for this energy include:

  • Awkward
  • Clumsy
  • Incongruent
  • Worry
  • Self-sabotage

Advice: Nothing ventured, nothing gained but equally, nothing is lost – or is it?


7-9 August

With the Sun in Leo (hot-dry) and the Moon in Aries (hot-dry), the energy is Choleric.

Humoural theory is based on the ancient and medieval physiology and medicine as expounded by Empedocles, Hippocrates, and Galen. It’s all to do with the four blocks or ‘roots’ of the material world (Fire, Earth, Water, and Air) that manifest in certain humours and their related temperaments. Humoural theory underpinned much of Early Modern drama, and was extensively used by well-known playwrights of the period like Shakespeare and John Webster.

Previously, we have experienced Choleric as associated with the angry, ‘oft malicious’ Ferdinand in Webster’s The Duchess of Malfi and concluded this was his temperament about which nothing much could be done. But with today’s energy we ought to dig deeper.

Ferdinand intends to ‘purge’ his temper on his sister (a ‘notorious strumpet’). She has married not to his liking even whilst he has no problem that his brother, the Cardinal, keeps as his mistress, another man’s wife.

Might this be sexual libido gone wrong? It’s a reasonable suggestion what with all the knives and their phallic symbolism – Ferdinand does sneaks into his sister’s boudoir to surprise her with a knife. Arguably, Ferdinand seems to struggle to control his passions – consider his protestations about the effect on him of his sister’s body (‘Damn her, That body of hers’).

With this, the focus is no longer just on a choleric brother having a 17th century rant but on the sexual politics of the period. Might such politics still inform our own today?

Some key words for this energy include:

  • Fierce
  • Ambitious
  • Intolerant
  • Self-focused
  • Abrupt

Advice: Learn from literature if you want things better not worse.


Published by debramoolenaar

Formerly an American lawyer specialising in international tax, I'm now an astrologer, novelist, and aspiring life coach.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: