The Week Ahead

27-28 July

With the Sun in Leo (hot-dry) and the Moon in Scorpio (cold-wet), the energy of today and tomorrow is Choleric/Phlegmatic.


Humoural theory is based on the ancient and medieval physiology and medicine as expounded by Empedocles, Hippocrates, and Galen. It’s all to do with the four blocks or ‘roots’ of the material world (Fire, Earth, Water, and Air) that manifest in certain humours and their related temperaments. Often, we experience various combinations of the four humours resulting in mixed temperaments – the less balance between them – the worse as we will soon discover.


Choleric energy is characterised as commanding and aggressive. It is a time of energetic enthusiasm that may lead to impulsive ‘hot-headedness’. Add to that the slow-paced deliberation of the self-contented Phlegmatic and we can expect an ‘eh’ couple of days.

This makes perfect sense when we remember that Leo and Scorpio are in a challenging square (90 degree) aspect to each other. In psychological astrology, the square aspect is linked to tension and conflict, which might be used for highly creative endeavours – but usually isn’t.

In his translation of Galen’s Art of Physick, the one good thing that Nicholas Culpeper says about the Choleric/Phlegmatic energy is that is less vicious than the pure Choleric. However, perhaps the reason he neglects to instruct us further on this point is because in effect, one delivers a nasty cold shower to the otherwise unsuspecting, unbridled passions of the other.

Some key words for this energy include:

  • Halting
  • Out of sync
  • Lethargic
  • Malicious
  • Reserved

Advice: All things in moderation but then again, maybe not. 


29-30 July

With the Sun in Leo (hot-dry) and the Moon in Sagittarius (hot-dry), the energy of today and tomorrow is Choleric.


Humoural theory is based on the ancient and medieval physiology and medicine as expounded by Empedocles, Hippocrates, and Galen. It’s all to do with the four blocks or ‘roots’ of the material world (Fire, Earth, Water, and Air) that manifest in certain humours and their related temperaments. Humoural theory underpins much of Early Modern drama and was extensively used by well-known playwrights of the period like Shakespeare.


We last addressed Choleric energy not long ago when both the Moon and the Sun were in Leo. This time is different. This is because the fire of Sagittarius is of a less intense, less personal nature than in Leo. Is also brings the benevolence of Jupiter, king of gods, to the table.

Whilst the effect of Leo/Leo is akin to well-tended hearth fire, over which the evening meal is cooked, the effect of Leo/Sagittarius of one of bright sparks of intuition marked with good humour and good fortune. 😉

For the table, sir, it shall be served in; for the meat, sir, it shall be covered; for your coming in to dinner, sir, why, let it be as humours and conceits shall govern. 

The Merchant of Venice, 3.5.22

Some key words for this energy include:

  • Enthusiastic
  • Jolly
  • Commanding
  • Generous
  • Hospitable

Advice: Like a fine wine, savour every little bit of luck!


30 July – 2 August

With the Sun in Leo (hot-dry) and the Moon in Capricorn (cold/dry), the energy of today and tomorrow is Choleric/Melancholic.

Humoural theory is based on the ancient and medieval physiology and medicine as expounded by Empedocles, Hippocrates, and Galen. It’s all to do with the four blocks or ‘roots’ of the material world (Fire, Earth, Water, and Air) that manifest in certain humours and their related temperaments. Humoural theory underpinned much of Early Modern drama, and was extensively used by well-known playwrights of the period like Shakespeare.

We have previously experienced the combination of Choleric/Melancholic as ambitious but self-cancelling; this time it may become your undoing. To understand how it works, let’s take a closer look at Shakespeare’s tragic character Hamlet.

Although a Choleric/Melancholic mix, Hamlet is prone the Melancholic. This becomes evident when Rosencrantz and Guildenstern arrive at court. Not only does Hamlet tell them that he has ‘lost all my mirth’ but also that he has ‘forgone all custom of exercises’. Later in the same scene he actually names his complaint – ‘my melancholy’. But regardless of how many times Rosencrantz reminds Hamlet of his ‘ambitions’ suggesting that Hamlet’s friend sees him as Choleric/Melancholic and hence having ambitions, Hamlet refuses to engage with the full range of his temperaments. He does not ‘strive’ to be ‘judicious’ but instead allows himself to wallow in melancholy’s ‘foul and pestilent congregation of vapours.’

Literature critic TS Eliot (Hamlet and His Problems) suggests it was this Melancholic wallowing that made Hamlet an ‘artistic failure’.  

Some key words for this energy include:

  • Shamefaced
  • Bashful
  • Sober
  • Fretful
  • Solitude

Advice: Rise above your troubles least they rise above you.


Published by debramoolenaar

Formerly an American lawyer specialising in international tax, I'm now an astrologer, novelist, and aspiring life coach.

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