The Week Ahead

6-8 July

With the Sun in Cancer and the Moon in Aquarius, the energy of the next two and one/half days is akin to the tarot trump, The Star. 

The 18th century philosopher Kant said ‘two things fill me with admiration the starry sky above me and moral law within me.’ But it was the 17th century French physicist and mathematician, Pascal, who said, when speaking of the heavens that would later so enchant Kant, that the ‘silence of these infinite spaces frightens me’.  

Such is the dilemma of today’s energy: if unlike Kant, we fail to find faith in the future we surely will not be filled with admiration yet at the same time, the unknown of those infinite spaces that that so frightened Pascal are truly scary.

Worse, our brains are hard-wired to cling to tired assumptions and misperceptions about how the future will look based solely on the past. We each have a natural bias to ideas and suggestions that confirm, rather than contradict, what we already believe. 

There are ways to interrupt this pattern of unhelpful thinking but you first have to realise it is happening and identify it as such. Each morning, try jotting down a couple of things about how you expect the day to pan out and review them just before going to bed. Were you right or wrong or somewhere in between? After a few days, you’ll begin to see a trend.

Questioning your current situation in this way can open new paths to creative thinking  about possibilities may present themselves tomorrow and the next day after that.


9-10 July

With Sun in Cancer and the Moon in Pisces, the energy of the next two days is akin to the tarot trump, The Moon. The energy is dreamy and full of mystery but beware, everything looks different by moonlight then it does in the cold, harsh light of day.

This is the stuff of Greek tragedy, the themes of which still infuse contemporary Western literature, film, and drama. The existentialist philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche was convinced that a significant reason that Greek tragedy has been such a huge success is because it celebrates the Dionysian urge to life, the deep, dark primitive urges that men and animals share alike. But it is more than that, said Nietzsche. The primary appeal is that in Greek tragedy, the hero suffers and the audience enjoys the show.

The real problem here is that in ancient Greece, Dionysus was not just the God of Wine providing us with the means to have a good time, but a dangerous Olympian whose special power was to drive mortals insane. 

In the tarot, The Moon warns of similar dangers when we allow ourselves to make choices based not on how things are but instead of how we might want them to be. Remember that the hero in Greek tragedy suffers not just because he has a fatal flaw, but that he embraces it, willingly or otherwise.

Please, don’t do the same.


11-13 July

With the Sun in Cancer and the Moon in Aries, the energy is akin to the Knight of Cups. It’s a time to move confidently toward cherished goals and dreams powered by more passion than you might have felt in years.

The reality is that most of us assume that the future will be just like the past and in doing so, we’re almost certain to ensure that it will be. Even worse, we usually focus on that which isn’t working instead of what is working and in this way prove ourselves right about our assumptions.

Break this habit by using a technique inspired by phenomenology, a philosophical tradition launched in the first half of the 20th century by existentialist thinkers like Husserl and Heidegger.

Phenomenology asks us to set aside obfuscating preconceptions and let something reveal itself to us. This is not to be accomplished, as Nietzsche might suggest, by pushing, prodding, and/or exercising ‘power over’that something. Instead it’s about getting creatively descriptive about it in new ways.

As you read each of the following, jot down all the assumptions that automatically come to mind. These may include words, images, thoughts, colours, smells. Next, challenge your assumptions and jot down as many alternative meanings to each sentences as you can.

  • I’m fine.
  • She ran like hell.
  • Whatever you want.
  • I know exactly what you mean.
  • I bumped into him at the supermarket.

What have you noticed about the meanings that you automatically make in comparison with all the potential meanings that could be made? How might this help you to picture differently where you are today and what could be your tomorrow?


Published by debramoolenaar

Formerly an American lawyer specialising in international tax, I'm now an astrologer, novelist, and aspiring life coach.

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